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and others. and in germany. >> family members are outraged. they were hurt that these support centers are closing in by a jenning but at some point, an airline has to say, we don't have any more information, right, we have to do this or is this timing particularly bad? >> well, the timing is particularly bad because there is still for the answers where their loved ones are. but in most air crash accidents, certainly all the ones i have worked on, the airline usually closes down its support system and they have a care team assigned member assigned to each family. they cut that off at about day 45 and that's pretty standard and the reason is, that is in most cases, the case is moving on to a different stage, here because they don't have a plane or their loved ones, it's particularly bad timing. it's not unusual to close it down about this point. >> oh, boy, thanks so much to both of you. appreciate it. >> already. the other woman in this clipper owners scandal is talking. what she told barra walters about her relationship with donald sterling and whether she thinks she a racist. first,
the juxtaposition of nazi germany with guernsey's ancient towns in narrow streets yet the channel islands guernsey and jersey alternately with the only pieces of british land captured in acute hide for five long years by the germans. i think we have a little catching up to do here. i will just carry on and we will catch up with it. i notice whenever i'm there that islanders have quite an emphasis on sound, the sound of martial music in their street, the ring of jack boots that echoed off the buildings of their high street and in that there is some sense of violation but also a fascination of this simple incongruity of the whole thing. now what was that oddness that always fascinated me ever since i started visiting guernsey in the 1970s. i was introduced to the island courtesy of my older sister who had the good sense to meet and marry a guernsey man. so i spent many years going back and forth to visit them. we were just going because it was such a beautiful place to visit. i was always struck when i went there gossip and rumor became new means of sending information around the island. they also s
to be making much of a difference and now you've got the white house and you've got germany and other members of the european union who are threatening more sanctions. how might that really impact the situation there? >> well, sanctions need to do two things. one, they need to punish the russians for the actions that they've already taken in annexing crimea, illegally, totally unprovoked. the second thing they need to deter the russians from further action. the russians have already gone beyond crimea. they've already sent their special forces into eastern ukraine to stir up trouble, and that's the trouble you're seeing now in eastern ukraine. it is only in eastern ukraine where the russians sent in their special forces that there's any difficulty around that country, around ukraine. the rest of the country is calm. so the sanctions which should go into effect now, the elevated sanctions, the harsher sanctions are necessary now, not waiting for two more weeks. >> the u.s., president obama had been meeting and talking with angela merkel. germany has some leverage in all this, doesn't it? it se
's most infamous names. herman goering, hitler's number two, commander of germany's air force, the luftwaffe, and the force behind the third reich's final solution. albert spear, hitler's architect and the armaments minister. to mine granite used in germany's granite plants. the field marshal and second only to hitler in germany's military hire ary. the reich's labor minister in charge of what one historian called, quote, the greatest round-up of slaves in history. and hans frank, hitler's personal lawyer and eventually the governor general of to polander where he earned pick names such as slayer of the poles and the butcher of cra cow. on that friday in june, 1947, von poppen testified in courtroom 600. when he finished, all 21 of the nazi prisoners, including the catholics and those who had refused any spiritual counsel, signed it. it read in part: your husband, pastor gerecke, has been taking religious care of the undersigned defendants during the nuremberg trial. he has been doing so for more than half a year. we now have heard, dear mrs. gerry key, that you wish to see hi
stallone and timbers took the italian stallion to europe and after a successful two-year run in germany -- >> this is show number 56. did you know that? >> oh, my gosh. >> reporter: "rocky" is on broadway. >> still feels like we just recently opened. it's great. the set's still, like -- i guess looking kind of run down as it's supposed to. this is rocky's apartment right here. >> reporter: at 35 alex timbers is already a veteran of broadway drawing a claim for shows ranging from "bloody bloodsy andrew jackson" to the pee-wee herman show. still, timbers was an underdog to lead rocky's revival. when you were diving into this project, had you seen the "rocky" movies? >> no i hadn't seen it. >> reporter: how did you do that? how did you come prepared if you hadn't seen the movie? >> an asset. treat the script by a dramatic text. spent pictures pulling this is what boxers look like what philadelphia looks like. i came in and said, this is what my version of "rocky" based on your script would be. >> reporter: this week "rocky" was nominated for four tony a awards including
the sanctions are are not known. >> germany rles on russia -- relies on russia for gas. >> energy flows conditioned during the height of the cold war. the idea that you turp off the tap -- turn off the tap on russian oil and gas exports, i think, is unreallistic. >> barack obama said sanctions could hit the armed sector, finance or lines of credit for trade. the two world leaders held their first meeting in three years, the ukraine crisis bringing them together in a way ta looked unlikely. germany's leaders are angry over n.s.a. eaves dropping on angela merkel's private phone calls. the chancellor saying there's room to cooperate. >> translation: there are differences of opinion over what balance to strike over surveillance to protect sit dispns and preinging the privacy -- citizens and protecting privacy. >> president obama was pawned to see the degree to -- pained to see the degree to which the edward snowden dislorms affected his relationship with germany. he tried to reassure. >> i have taken the unprecedented step of ordering our intelligence committees to take the rive si interest
to one boss who says he is hiring right now. also what america could learn from germany about jobs and training skilled workers. plus prayers and property, i'll show you how the real estate market has been a blessing for churches looking to sell. i'm ali velshi, and this is "real money." >> this is "real money," you are the most important part of the show so tell me what is on your mind tweet me or go to facebook. i do read this stuff. the economy added 288,000 new jobs in april most of them came from the private sector. economists hope for 150 or 200,000 new jobs to get added every month just to keep up with new entrants to the job market. so the fact that we overshot that in april is really good news, and april has been a big acceleration from the prior months. another positive the number of long-term unemployed came down in april by 287,000. now i always say ignore the unemployment rate unless it's convenient for me to help tell a story. focus instead on that, the number of jobs added every month. in april the rate dropped .4 of a percentage point the lowest in 5.5 years. over t
to say germany was surrounded by friends and everything is wonderful. obviously we need to take a fresh look because o'land is our immediate neighbor, part of our club, our union, and pole -- pollland has a bored irwith ukraine and if there's chaos in ukraine and beyond it affects our very own security and that of all of nate at the and the i as well. so, yes, i think there must be a comprehensive review of our priorities, both in the e.u. and in nato, but let's not do it, if i may say so with foaming at the mouth. let's do it cool, and let's do it also, always, in -- with having in mind consistency. >> on that thought we're going to questions from the audience. if you just briefly give your name and affiliation. you know the rule, a question, not a statement. >> thank you. from george washington university. we talked about in april of 2008 the nato summit decided to not extend membership action to ukraine and georgia, and within four months georgia was invaded. with hindsight, the word wisdom has been subpoena number of times today. is it your view that things in -- not to extend prote
by the principle that europe, germany, and united states could not wish for a more reliable partner respectively than we have in the transatlantic alliance. the alliance is a prime importance to all of us and this is the basis for our very close economic cooperation as well. the transatlantic economic the whole 15ure on million jobs on that side of the atlantic. it is indispensable. german companies alone a great in more than 600,000 jobs over haveand american companies created 800,000 jobs as of now. the u.s. chamber of commerce is an eloquent testament to these very close integrations of our tool economic areas. the world has changed incredibly. you have more of a political and theomic weight of economies, the overall framework of the g 20. the global financial and economic crisis as greatly impaired progress and growth in the countries which has a lasting impact. globally, we see a tightening of growth which is something we are very pleased to. of imf is excepting growth 3.6% and next year to 3.9%. reason for usbe a to be complacent. in europe and the united states, just as other industrializ
repeatedly. we were promised that after germany's unification than it would not spread eastward. a started expanding and incorporating former warsaw treaty countries. we heard in response this does not concern you. nations and countries have the war to choose the way of ensuring the security. that's true, but it's also true when the infrastructure of the military bloc approaches our borders we have grounds for apprehension question. no one could deny as this right. he went on to say have been no and western leaders have long many times tsongas, made decisions behind the back of price wars and accomplished fact some today we want to examine whether in natal and the newly expanded nato alliance is now reaping the whirlwind of that decision and the ukraine. the of a very distinguished panel of people here today who are essentially present at the creation in one way or another. you will have biographies, but briefly the former foreign minister and actually first prime minister and then foreign minister of poland, going to make the your first name. on my immediate left, prime minister of poland
, and energy. germany relies on russian energy, but merkel agreed to this to include it as long as her country's inevitable economic pain is shared with other countries. now, today's little meeting with president and merkel didn't go so well, apparently. the president still walking on egg shells over the whole nsa revelation that the u.s. spied on chancellor merkel. asked whether somehow she has trust that has been rebuilt with the president, she dodged simply saying, we have a few difficulties yet to overcome. lester? >> chuck todd tonight at the white house. thanks. >>> house speaker john boehner began appointing a committee today to investigate the september 11, 2012, attack on the u.s. diplomatic post in benghazi, libya, that killed four americans including u.s. ambassador chris stevens. and separately the republican chairman of the house oversight committee, darrell issa, subpoenaed secretary of state john kerry to testify about the administration's response to the attack. skipping the usual step of issuing an official invitation to appear. a release of internal white house e-mails with n
, or line of trade. the two world leaders held their first meeting in two years. germany's leaders are still angry over revelation of nsa eavesdropping on merkel's private phone calls. the chancellor says there's room to cooperate over intelligence. >> yet there are differences of opinion on what sort of balance the strike between intensity of surveillance, trying to protect the citizens against threats and on the other hand protecting the individual privacy and individual freedom. >> reporter: president obama said he was pained to see the degree to which the snowden disclosures had strained his personal relationships with merkel and the strong u.s. alliance with germany. tried reassure merkel that the u.s. citizensful. >> have taken the unprecedented step of ordering our intelligence communities to take privacy interests of non-u.s. persons into account in that everything they do. thank you very much everybody. >> but the two parted ways friday without hammering out a l potential u.s. spy or intelligence agreement. libby casey al jazeera washington. >> 20 years ago today, flaight beganato
germany has much as stake here. it gets one third of the oil and gas from russia. the president says harsher sanctions could be the next step. >> the goal is not to punish russia, but to give them an incentive to choose the better course. >> eastern ukraine has been teetering on the brink for weeks cities and towns falling like dominoes today more than 30 people died in a fire. the blaze sparked by violence. police there said four people were killed in clashes. the president and chancellor said the president is looking for a diplomatic solution to this crisis but russia needs to step up. >> rescue efforts underway in afghanistan today officials say 350 dead and 2000. the rest of the village has been evacuated out of here of landslides. >> house speaker john boehner says he plans to establish a select committee to investigate an embassy attack in libya. issa wants to know why e mails were oem mitted from previous administration submissions. four people died in that attack. >> the cdc says a deadly virus turned up in the u.s. for the first time. an american in saudi arabia is in the ho
merkel, chancellor of germany is visiting today. the most productive country in europe. 40% of young people in apprenticeship programs. it has no minimum wage. in fact, if you look at western europe as a group, the countries that have a minimum wage have 13.8% unemployment. the countries with no minimum wage, and these are, by the way, higher income countries. these are norway, sweden, austria, germany. they have 6.3% unemployment. what's wrong with this country? here are countries that say we're going to be economically productive. they have half the unemployment rate of the countries that have a social welfare state. what am i missing here? >> one, i lived in england for two years. i know great britain and know europe very well. what you're missing is they have a safety net, first of all. they have universal health care. day have -- young people have access to education. cost of housing is much lower. their governments ensure that there's a minimum standard of living and, in fact, the unemployment compensation is there for them. in fact -- >> i'm going to shock you, too. i think ca
personal relationship with merkel and a strong u.s. alliance with germany. he tried to assure germans that regular citizens are not subject to surveillance. >> what i've tried odo is take the unprecedented step of ordering our intelligence communities to take the privacy of of normal u.s. dissention into everything they do. >> the president saying the u.s. doesn't have such an arrangement with any of its closest partners. >> david, the story is that you were talking about an agreement along these lines and then pulled back on it. the president said no we never had that as a plan. while we are interested in some intelligence sharing, privacy-sharing, we'll see how that plays out, because many of the reporters from germany are very interested on the u.s. position on spying and how chancellor merkel is was responding to the president's words. >> lobby, be merkel having the most contact with the russian president did she havefully sense? >> can be found but she was putting sanctions on the table and she was talking about next steps. she like president obama holdings out these late may ele
in germany with hitler? an ableonsidered manager. that is basically what happened. that is basically the root of the problem today with the theine that is part of russian establishment. do you know what happened? 1994, russian elite, the ruling class, those who benefited the most and privatized the results of the --ocratic revolution of 1991 i haven't seen any of those in the so-called white house in augustthe coup 1991. they were quick to privatize the and gasw from the oil experts, which is still the basic economy. amazing the russian onte today is mostly based -- that is the answer to the question. russian elite to enable, theleft russia to post-soviet propaganda that is what it is today. >> [inaudible] [laughter] >> it is very painful for me to say these things. nd disappointed but did you think this would be a back door way? this would morph into an to nato pathway membership even though at the time it was painted in a different fashion? >> i will be frank. at this moment, we are very disappointed. the -- fourhat was nato membership, for the first time, and member of the polish governmen
of ukraine. "the washington post" quotes him saying he's embarrassed that germany's failure of leadership. he's already made clear that's how he feels about the obama administration refusal to provide defensive weapons. the u.n. security council held its 13th emergency session on the crisis. this one called by russia, which blames the violence on kiev and its western enablers. >>> up next, the new jobs numbers and what they tell us. fox 45 in baltimore with clean up following the collapse of a sidewalk and retaining wall wednesday after it came down after heavy rains over the past 24 hours. take a look at that. >>> fox 31 in louisville with preparations for saturday's 140th kentucky derby. about the timers on the runs for the roses will be getting a little less back if they win this year. this is a live look at new york from fox 5, the big story there ton, a subway derailment in queens that sent four people to the hospital with very serious injuries. six subway cars of a manhattan brooklyn bound express train went off the tracks this morning but remained upright. that's outside the beltway. w
on these expansions. germany gets $50.2 billion in exports to russia. german lobby groups are counting numbers of 3000 jobs are dependent on russian trade. interest as well. there is major interest in pushing hard on angela merkel. >> doesn't germany import a lot of natural gas from russia? other issues is on the energy side of things. you heard president obama and chancellor merkel address that today. what we're looking at next, according to officials, and the president, if sanctions are to be expanded they're going to target entire sectors. financial services, defense, and that should mean energy. when it comes to europe, that is a major problem. what chancellor merkel said today, six countries are 100% reliant on russian gas. germans are taking a third of their gas from russia. before -- for sex how they do the is a huge question right now because of the damage that would be in norma's in the european area. waxing want to thank you for this developing story. when russian forces invaded the ukraine crimea peninsula in late february, it prompted one job atist to rethink her russia's news network. >>
lead." the world lead. as pro russia protesters shoot helicopters out of the sky, germany's chancellor angela merkel talks about squeezing more sanctions on russia. >> jeb, if you need some advice, give me a call. >> increasingly it seems that republican donors may be inclined to and the pop culture lead, do you think this gives you a respectability that you didn't have before? >> absolutely not. >> joel mchale has something to make fun of, us, the host of "the soup" and the star of "the community" drops by "the lead" ahead of the white house correspondents' dinner. good afternoon, everyone. i'm jake tapper. we'll begin with the world lead. death in ukraine. 31 people died at a trade union building while the cause is not perfectly clear, odessa is currently being torn apart by rioting and clashes between ukrainian royalists and pro-russia activists with thousands positioned near the eastern border. but right here in the u.s., president obama and german chancellor angela merkel meeting at the white house today emerging with some tough talk about their willingness to squeeze sectors of t
threats? plus president obama and germany fell chancellor angulo merkel met at the white house today. will tighter -- german chancellor angela helmet at the white house today. will tighter sanctions actually change the situation in ukraine? we will be talking about that, next. ♪ its focus is shifting to cyber security, examining financial firms' preparedness for cyber threats. they are looking at how secure they really are. joining me, the former white house cyber security commissioner tom kellerman. what is the sec's biggest fear? what is going on? >> the lack of reporting in the marketplace. more firms are being breached. significant resources in material risk. >> financial firms? >> broker's houses, major publicly traded companies. >> how is it we do not hear about that? >> off and they are not aware they have been breached until they are notified that their accounts are being sold and bartered in the shadow economy. >> it is terrifying because you think of your financial data being out there. it really means we are all being vulnerable in a certain way. who is responsible, wou
.s. and germany back together as the cycle rolls on. it's friday, may 2nd. r. try phillips fiber good gummies. r. they're delicious, and an excellent source of fiber to help support regularity. wife: mmmm husband: these are good! marge: the tasty side of fiber. from phillips. if yand you're talking toevere rheuyour rheumatologistike me, about a biologic... this is humira. this is humira helping to relieve my pain. this is humira helping me lay the groundwork. this is humira helping to protect my joints from further damage. doctors have been prescribing humira for ten years. humira works by targeting and helping to block a specific source of inflammation that contributes to ra symptoms. humira is proven to help relieve pain and stop further joint damage in many adults. humira can lower your ability to fight infections, including tuberculosis. serious, sometimes fatal events, such as infections, lymphoma, or other types of cancer, have happened. blood, liver and nervous system problems, serious allergic reactions, and new or worsening heart failure have occurred. before starting humira, your docto
, germany, brazil. who have used columbine as an inspiration. and it's all that publicity that columbine got. the columbine killers they decided they wanted to feel important. and they sought revenge. revenge against their classmates who bullied them. maybe against all of society. and it seems to me that is the motive in this case, as well. >> i know -- i know it's revenge, i know a lot of it is notoriety. how could one not know about columbine even if you were a kid when that happened? i've heard a lot of folks say we, the media, we the public shouldn't be uttering the suspects' names because that then, of course, raises them to a level and elevates them to a level we shouldn't be doing. but do you think that would take away, you know, and some of these other potential school shooters' minds. the troubled minds, the intent to kill? >> first of all, the reporters have a duty to tell the public. and also, the idea of making them into big shot celebrities, putting them on the cover of celebrity magazines. but keep in mind that the copycat factor is inspired by all of this attention. during the
the divide between the u.s. and germany on nsa surveillance. president obama also faced a question from the international press about tuesday's botched oklahoma execution. on ukraine both leaders seemed amenable to the possibility of further sanctions that take direct aim at key sectors of the russian economy. sanction that is could potentially damage a sluggish european economy as well. president obama said it all depends on how deeply russia interferes with ukraine in the lead-up to its elections later this month. >> if, in fact, we see the disruptions and the destabilization continuing so severely that it impedes elections on may 25th, we will not have a choice but to move forward with additional more severe sanctions. >> for her part chancellor merkel told the associated press -- the assembled press that, "the post-war order has been put into question by the actions of russia and vladimir putinin." it comes as ukraine has attempted to take back one key city, leaving at least two dead in the fighting and separatists have downed at least two ukrainian helicopters. a point the presiden
be in the thousands. ♪ >>> they stand united. that was the word from washington today as the president and germany's chancellor briefed reporters on the white house lawn. it was the first visit by angela merkel to the white house in three years, the two leaders discussing a wide range of issues talking about the crisis in ukraine and the nsa spy scandal that reported that perhaps her phone might have been tapped by the nsa. libby casey joins us by phone. and they seemed to be speaking from the same script. >> that's right, del. and one of the goals of this would be to portray a united front. the question is where do these countries go from here in terms of sanctions. even the new round of sanctions took a while to hammer out. and you could tell there are some differences when it comes to germany's goals and the u.s. goals in terms of how deep sanctions could or should go. because there are such close trade ties between germany and russia, especially in the oil and gas sector, so both leaderings pointing to may 25th as a crucial date, and urging t president putin to not interfere with the elections
. >>> now, despite merkel's calls for unity on russia, germany may have some problem with harsher sanctions. 36% of germany's natural gascon assumption comes from russia. 39% of their oil comes from russia. talk about going over a well, christopher chivas is a senior political analyst with the rand corporation. good to see you. will russia use this attack on pro-russian forces, separatists, whoever they are, inside ukraine as the provocation they were really looking for to attack and take territory from ukraine. >> i wouldn't be surprised at all, tyler, if that's what's going on. this is a strategy we have seen from russia before. the strategy is basically to aid and abet violence and turmoil and use it as an excuse for some kind of intervention. they probably will claim they're doing it on humanitarian grounds, but the reality will be that the large number of forces now poised on the border of eastern ukraine will move from russia into eastern ukraine. >> what is the end game here? what do you think will happen? will ukraine be split into two countries or what? >> it's very different to pr
. >>> other news, president obama and germany's leader facing some serious questions today on foreign policy flash points including the crisis in ukraine. the president just wrapped up a joint news conference with the german chancellor angela merkel. the u.s. is warning of tougher sanctions against russia over ukraine. the president saying the preference is a diplomatic solution but if that doesn't happen the next step is more sanctions. he says he understands the concerns of some european countries but he's confident the u.s. and the european union will stand together. >> the goal is not to punish russia. the goal is to give them an incentive to choose the better course. and that is to resolve these issues diplomatically. and i think we are united on that front. within europe, within the eu, i'm sure there has to be extensive consultations. you've got 28 countries and some are more vulnerable than others to potential russian retaliation. we have to take those into account. not every country is going to be in exactly the same place. what has been remarkable is the degree to which all countri
the u.s. and germany united and sent another stern warning to moscow. >> we are united in our determination to impose costs on russia for its actions as ukrainian forces move to restore order in eastern ukraine, it is obvious to the world that these russian-backed groups are not peaceful protesters but heavily armed militants receiving significant support from russia. >> times are also tense with ukrainian army launching the first major assault on separatist strong holds in the east of that country. a spokesman for putin called the move a criminal act. nbc news chief white house correspondent chuck todd, also host of "the daily rundown" joins us. how critical was it for the president to get merkel on board with sanctions? >> reporter: it's interesting, that is a glass is half full way of looking at it. here's what clearly they agree to. they have the next deadline that they've set to decide whether to do another round of sanctions and that is the may 25th election. you heard the president essentially say if russia destabilizing the situation, makes -- tries to mess with this e
in the intelligence that germany could offer. so we may see some warmth between the leaders, but you can bet behind closed doors there are much stronger wordings. >> and with the situation in ukraine, there was once that the two leaders stood side by side when it came to russia, and this time that is not a certainty. >> they realize that it would be in president putin's best interest to see daylight between what angela merkel and president obama want. however, they have different goals. germany is have codependant on russia when it comes to oil and gas, they do $100 billion in trade. and president obama pushing for much stronger sanctions and sanctions that have not yet hit the oil and gas industry. but even though they have different ultimate means to the end, they want president putin to listen. >> the hots on capitol hill saying they want more action in ukraine, some suggesting even that there be boots on the ground, and yet it is the european leaders that are the ones that would have to suffer the consequences of those boots on the ground and suffer through the economic sanctions that the white
. stuart: i believe in germany being late -- >> yes. stuart: order is half of life. order means being on time. when will we see when this show gets on the road? >> you are seeing a number of uncomfortable germans. i can guarantee that they are aware of it. the u.s. has thus far it decided to present a united front page to hold on, rich. president obama and angela merkel are walking to the podium. let's listen in. >> good morning, everybody. it is always a great pleasure to welcome my friend and chancellor merkel to the white house. germany is one of our strongest allies. with her indulgence, i want to start by making two brief comments. first, as president, my top priority is doing everything that we can to create more jobs and opportunities for working families. this morning we learned that our business has created 9.2 million new jobs over 50 executive months of job growth. the grit and determination the american people is moving forward. we have to focus on job creation and or opportunities for working families. raising the minimum wage to creating good construction jobs in mid-ame
to him multiple timesk and germany is pivotal, because they are reluctant to go further with the further ek sectorial sanctions, because of the impact on the german economy. the trade between germany and russia was $1 billion and u.s. and germany was only $38 million. and germany gets roughly one-third of the oil and gas from russia, so a real concern within the german industry that they are the ones putting the pressure on angela merkel to be careful of what she does next because of the ricochet effect, and anything they do in russia could come back to haunt the german economy as well. >> a lot of money is at stake. and ambassador holliday, i want to get to you, and what do you think about the sanctions, and could they really get vladimir putin to change course here? >> well, it is going to be difficult to get him to change the course, but the increased sa sanctions could be twofold. one, we could get the europeans and germany in particular to escalate the sanctions on targeted energy companies, on that sector, but broadly speaking, we could go up to full sectorial sanctions which would
? >> stand by. jim, how much distance, daylight, is there between the u.s. and germany on the imp sigs of sanctions? >> clearly enough to keep the real sector sanctions. really the step that's going to make a difference and impose a real economic price on russia and we saw that difference in the last week when you had the obama administration seemingly teeing up harder sanctions than they were able to deliver when announced earlier this week. but two, the u.s. administration has made clear that they're holding those sanctions for the event that russian troops roll across the border into ukraine and they'll make the point we need that step, we need to impose some sort of price. the trouble is, that lays out the possibility for what's happening now, which is in effect, the stealth invasion. russian directed separatists taking over cities and towns causing disruption, shooting down helicopters. it's a real problem. >> the u.s. has made the point, administration officials make the point over and over again, the unity of the united states with the european union is what's all important here
undocumented people in this country. >> i am an undocumented immigrant from germany. >> we mow your lawn, we work at your houses, maybe we are your doctors, nurses. we are not who you think we are. >> people who have come here illegally should not be citizens of the united states. >> so what happens if you discover that someone is an undocumented person? a major blow for immigration reform today. the senate voted against the dream act. >> i'm a hard-core republican but i do not agree with them on this. >> you are an illegal alien. >> know, i'm a undocumented -- >> i think i'm breaking the rules by having you in my studio. >> we dream of a path to citizenship. we dream of contributing to the country we call our home. i have this fantasy that i get a green card and i fly and that my mother is there waiting for me. >> the trailer for "documented: a film by an undocumented american," written, produced, and directed by josÉ antonio vargas. he is with us in new york. the film opens tonight in new york, coming to theaters all over the country. welcome back to democracy now. , and nowt your journey
. thanwonder if we care more angela merkel does. germany has a great business relationship with russia. wentieve gerhard schroder to work for a russian company after he was chancellor of germany. it seems that america has this , cold war,0's style leftover unhappiness, but no reason to be so worried. quickly direct economic interest in ukraine for the united states is not great. is alsode with russia not huge, although companies such as exxon mobil and boeing have important projects in russia. but it is important for foreign policy credibility. the u.s. has certain red lines. it committed to defending ukraine's territorial sovereignty. that credibility is important with respect to asia. president obama was reassuring asian partners and allies the u.s. would come to their defense in a situation in which chinese territorial ambitions seem to be growing. or is a broader repercussion that goes beyond ukraine and russia for the united states. >> we seem to be spreading ourselves them. we are going to defend asian countries against china? we are going to defend the ukraine against russia? di
it repeatedly saying we were promised after germany's unification nato wouldn't expand eastward but they started expanding and taking warsaw treaty countries. when we said why are you doing this we heard this doesn't concern you nations and countries have the right to chose their own security. and he said that is true. but whether the infrastructure of military blocks or approaches our borders we must take concern steps and no one can deny this. he said nato and leaders lied many times and placed before him an accomplished fact and that is what happened with nato expansion. tonight we want to examine whether nato and the expanded nato alliance is reaping the worldwind of the decision in ukraine. we have a panel here of people who were present at the creation in one way or another. the former minister and then -- or first prime minister and then former minister of poland here and i will butcher your name. he was the prim minister in '87 when they were first invited to join. next is the foreign minister at the waning base of the soviet union and 1991-1996 of russia and was involved in this drama.
against russia clear in recent weeks. as a result, germany's position is unlikely to shift, barring a dramatic escalation of the conflict in ukraine. we will hear from chancellor merkel and president obama. in the meantime, a washington journal discussion this morning on the effectiveness of sanctions. host: our friday roundtable focusing on the issue of sanctions as a foreign-policy tool, do they work? carla anne robbins is a senior fellow at the council on foreign relations. mark dubowitz of the foundation for democracy. "the wall street journal" the president meets with angela merkel. german companies opposing sanctions, can you explain. guest: german companies opposed sanctions against iran, it is no surprise they are opposing sanctions against russia. the german corporate lobby is very strong. it is no surprise. it is a very strong economic relationship between germany and russia. including former german chancellor, who is making a lot of money helping natural gas flow from russia to germany. no surprise. angela merkel is under pressure. host: one of the fundamental flaws of sa
, to the white house. germany is one of our strongest allies, and angela is one of my closest partners. with her indulgence, i want to start by making two brief comments. first, as president, my top priority is doing everything that we can to create more jobs and opportunity for hard-working families, for our economic strength is a source of strength in the world. this morning we learned that our business has created 273,000 new jobs last month. all told our businesses have now created 9.2 million new jobs over 50 consecutive months of job growth. the grit and determination of the american people are moving us forward, but we have to keep a relentless focus on job creation and creating more opportunities for working families. there's plenty more that congress should be doing, from raising the minimum wage to creating good construction jobs, rebuilding america. and i want to work with them wherever i can, but i keep acting on my own wherever i must to make sure every american who works hard has the chance to get ahead. second point, i also want to say on behalf of the american people that our tho
in germany are not favorably seen, at least by the german business lobby. let's get to john harwood at the white house with more. john? >> not seen positively by the german business community or the business community elsewhere in europe, but i expect them to talk about trying to maintain a united front on sanctions. the nsa. they will have a news conference, a press availability after their meeting around 11:45 and i think you can also expect, carl, the president to have some sort of remarks off the top about these stronger than expected jobs numbers. >> all right. john, we'll come back to you for that later this morning. john harwood at the white house. another sign of the economic recovery. the ceo of host hotels, the country's largest lodging reit, says group bookings are up. he'll join us live in just a few minutes. later on, the ceo of expedia will join us with the first reaction to earnings last night. a lot more "squawk on the street" with dows close to session highs up 48. ♪ [ banker ] sydney needed some financial guidance so she could take her dream to the next level. so
and on this issue, of course, of ukraine. it is also important to note that germany has a lot of economic ties with russia, and the question is whether you put more economic pressure on that country and actually affect the economic relations between germany and russia. so, a lot to think about here especially since big german companies, volkswagen to name one, have a huge stake in russia. and the more pressure you put on, the harder it is for those companies to continue to do business very well and thrive, carol. >> joe johns reporting live from the white house this morning. thank you. >>> still to come in the "newsroom," tensions flare and ukraine's military mobilizes. we'll look at a new offensive that could push the country closer to widespread fighting. [announcer] play close-good and close. help keep teeth clean and breath fresh with beneful healthy smile food. with special crunchy kibbles and great taste, it's a happy way to a healthy smile. beneful healthy smile food and snacks. the average person will probably eat something or drink something that is acidic on a daily basis. those acid
on the border this morning, germany's chancellor angela merck la -- delivers as new message this morning. >> and the jobs number shows the economy may finally be bouncing back after a brutal winter. it's the most jobs added in two years. thein employment rate plunged to 6.3%, the lowest it's been since 2008. february and march job totals were revised up by a combined 36,000. the average now for the last three months, 238,000 jobs, about 60,000 more than the average for the three months before. big winners by sectors include business services, retail, food services, construction and health care. bottom line, this number was much bigger than anticipated but it's not all good news. part of the reason that the unemployment rate is down is of course that the total labor force dropped again, this time by more than 800,000 in april after increasing by half a million. that total jobs number added a big deal. if you think about it over the last five years, april, may, june, every time it looked like the economy was bouncing back, they would just sort of suck the life out of the economic recovery
on sector sanctions that will get the attention of russia? that is a fundamental issue. is germany willing to sacrifice short-term economic growth to put pressure on president putin? that is a fundamental question that needs to be answered. >> do you think they will be able to come up with an answer? >> mohamed nailed the biggest question about the meeting today. when it comes to the next round of sanctions, the big hammer the west has had hanging over fiber over vladimir putin has been the sectoral sanctions. $50 will take a major hit, billion of imports. angela merkel is hearing from their business interests. they don't want anything to do with the sectoral sanctions. her ability to stay aligned with the president is crucial for sectoral sanctions to work and not be implemented in patchwork fashion. >> mohamed, you mentioned because the economy is getting tighter that the cost of protectionism is rising as well. >> it is interesting we have not seen protectionism happen like you would have expected when we went into a major economic slowdown. the key issue now is step-by-step this diplom
for it to be viable. currently, there is no such airport in japan. in germany, lufthansa is betting heavily on two of the world's largest commercial aircraft. the latest model of the boeing 747, and the massive airbus a380. one of the company's executives explains why. >> we have to see the position of frankfurt and also our hub in munich, and maybe in zurich, vienna also in the lufthansa group system so we have a possibility to connect a lot of european cities from these huge hubs, which means if you compare this with tokyo, tokyo is not a hub like frankfurt when it comes to servicing so many neighborhood countries. >> reporter: the situation in japan means airlines there are counting on smaller and more maneuverable planes. >> translator: japanese airlines are doing well financially. for example, japan airlines has just posted a profit of $1.5 billion. as far as our earnings are concerned, japanese companies have adopted a sounder strategy than their overseas competitors. it does seem wiser to be shifting towards midsize aircraft. >> reporter: for the time being, jumbo jets and airbus a380s oper
back to al jazeera america. >>> ahead in this half hour, exploring germany's roll, with angela merkel getting ready to meet at the whitehouse. >> why the controversy in brunai. >> we will focus on a medicalmist affecting a lot of kids. a physical illness causing what you see here, children exhibiting psychologistic behavior almost overnight. but first, let's check our top stories. violence e rurupting as ukraini forces crack down. the country's defense minister saying soldiers were killed when their helicopters were shot down. vladimir putin said it keeills y hope of keeping hope alive. >> police say 17-year-old john david ladieu was planning to kill his parents and sister and attack the heights. they were tipped off when someone saw him entering a storage unit. they found a journal detailing plans as well as weapons. >> john kerry set to meet with south sudan's president in an effort to end the civil war. he is urging both sides to stop the violence and is threatening sanctions on south sudan easy leaders. thousands have been killed because of the fighting and those supporting former
. it is a very strong economic relationship between germany and russia. including former german chancellor, who is making a lot of money helping natural gas flow from russia to germany. no surprise. angela merkel is under pressure. host: one of the fundamental flaws of sanctions as a foreign-policy tool? guest: it is limited and a blunt instrument but also there is no other choice. not a lot of other alternatives. politics are flawed, too. germany is russia's's largest trading partner in the eu. they have more economic interest in the u.s. and its owing to be hard to pressure russia and a major way unless the europeans are willing to play. host: let me share what jack lew told members of congress when it came to sanctions and at russia and the wealthy individuals linked to president putin. [video clip] >> if you look at the impact on russia's economy, it is misleading to look at what happens day by day. you have to look over the period of time since russia went into crimea and since we have imposed sanctions. there has been a substantial deterioration in rush's already weak economy. we see and
russian president putin told germany's chancellor that ukraine should withdraw its military from the eastern and southern parts of the country. president obama will meet with german chancellor angela merkel later today. >>> alarming news about greenhouse gases on our planet. new tests show the level of caon dioxide in our atmosphere is now at its highest in human history. one scientist told the san francisco chronicle, it is time to stop building things with tail pipes and smokestacks. >>> here they are. horses and jockeys getting ready for this weekend's kentucky derby. an unpredictable field this year. almost anybody could win in the two-minute race. prerace coverage begins at noon eastern, 9:00 pacific on nbc sports network. don't miss race coverage beginning at 4:00 p.m. eastern, 1:00 pacific, here on nbc. >>> in health news, a problem that keeps millions of americans up all night. now the fda approved a new pacemaker like device to treat sleep apnea. it happens when throat and tongue muscles relax blocking airwaves. the implant keep the air ways open by zapping them with an
from eastern ukraine being critical to de-escalate that. you andst met preferred, germany, we were covering a story for the european central bank. chancellor merkel speaks to present obama today. and they have a press conference. what will europe want to hear from chancellor merkel? will want what kiev to hear from chancellor merkel is that they are not going to hold back from further sanctions or any other action on russia after the latest exclamation -- escalation. of course for its part, russia is blaming ukraine, saying they sent a convoy in order to negotiate the release of the eight monitors who were captured by pro-russian separatists earlier. so i think what the ukraine wants to hear is that there is no stepping back, that they are ready to continue to back them on this. right heather, yesterday vladimir putin effectively told erchnof ofchurch an pull back. how are they reacting to that statement in kiev? are think people in kiev very much on amused by what putin has said after what happened here. it is pretty much business as usual, but they are obviously behind the govern
point ceases to be in the interests of the german government. germany gets a third of its oil and gas from russia and some of germany's best-known companies, volkswagen for one, have huge stakes in russia. so any type of sanction has a potential economic blowback and it's just a sign of how the west has a limited toolbox in dealing with the situation in ukraine, chris. >> all right, joe, thank you very much for the reporting. >>> let's bring in cnn military analyst james "spider" marks a retired major generally and former commanding general of the u.s. army intillgence center. general, thank you for joining us. let's leave the politics aside and deal with the urgency on the ground. what do you believe the situation is? who is ukraine fighting? what do you think the stakes are? >> fighting two elements really. you do have pro-russian separatists that are in east ukraine, but they're being supported directly, not only in terms of what i would call over-the-horizon support, weapons support, but also they have russian forces are on the ground instigating this and these are the folks we've
relationships between the u.s. and germany in the past. >> the snowden spy stuff really poisoned relationships. it is going to be on the back burner, but it will be raised. that won't dominate the conversation. there will be a little bit of talk about getting these trade talks back in order. merkel is meeting with companies in the states as well. for the most part, i think they have four hours of talk scheduled. this is going to be about ukraine's and how you unify and make sure that the u.s. and the eu are on the same page and how you can convince the russians the errors of their ways. >> hans, we will leave it there. correspondent,al hans nichols. >> pharma frenzy friday. uprazeneca's vid is going -- bid is going up. does seem, we were talking about consolidation. this is about drawing battle about right? this is every large pharmaceutical company trying to take a chunk of the business. >> what you have here is the king of the megamerger. they have done these deals before. destruction isue a big moot point. at the moment, what they're saying is they will a 50 quit on the table and are prepar
that killed four americans, including the u.s. ambassador to libya. general lovell was in germany awaiting orders to strike at the terrorists, orders that never came. >> what we did know quite early on is that this was a hostile action. this was no demonstration gone terribly awry. to the point of what happened, the facts led to the conclusion of a terrorist attack. the afri-con j 2 was focused on attribution. the attacks became attributable very soon after the event. >> so that means the u.s. military, the cia on the ground in libya, and pretty much everyone else directly involved with the benghazi attack knew it was not a spontaneous demonstration within hours. yet, as we proved yesterday, the obama administration created a fiction that the attack was a reaction to an anti-muslim videotape. the cover was blown off that deception this week when a memo by white house advisor ben rhodes was released through the freedom of information act. the memo clearly says that ambassador susan rice was prepped to tell the world on television that a videotape incited the murders in benghazi. incredibly,
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